Welcome to Greg Lake One-2-One

Included here are many, many questions asked to Greg by his fans and supporters, such as yourself. These questions have been answered personally by Greg.

We welcome you to submit a question for Greg, however, please read over all the questions already submitted and answered, so you do not duplicate them. Please keep in mind that Greg is currently writing and recording several music projects and can only answer a few at a time. He will try to get to as many as possible, but we can not assure that all questions will be answered.

In order to have your question considered, please include your name. In addition please include your email address just in case Greg wants to answer you directly. The latest posts are at the top.


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Question

Hello Greg!

I'm very proud to call me your fan, 'cos there is so many people who want to sing out loud with their heros name, but that's it. they won't go any further...This is the point I want to divert from rest of the fans. You see, I live in a city which lies a far from any subsuquent and important city. Kuusamo is over 800 km's from Helsinki (our capitol). But, to the point...you really have to come in Finland for a gig! I am a drummer, lyricist, bass player myself...I respect all ELP's aspects in their greatness. My greatest wish is to see you live in concert and maybe learn something out of it. Most sincerely. Tero Takalo, Kuusamo, Finland- And the question: Will You Ever Perform In Finland?

Answer

Dear Tero,

I would love to play in Finland. I am not sure why ELP have not played there in the past but we must try and put this right. If the opportunity arises and if concert dates are offered there then I can assure you that I will be more than happy to come and perform for you.

Best wishes,

Greg Lake.

(Oct-20-2010)

 
Question

When I watch you perform Pirates, it makes me wonder if you ever considered doing vocals for some of the earlier rock musical soundtracks.  I was listening to bits of Jesus Christ Superstar on I-Tunes (I used to play the album over and over in the 70's) and thought if Ian Gillan, why not Greg Lake?  I think your beautiful, dramatic voice would have been perfect for lots of roles.

Thanks, and I hope that Keith is on the mend and you will make another U.S. tour.  You guys were great in S.F.!

Cindy

Answer

Dear Cindy,

Thank you so much for your kind words and astute observations. As they say "watch this space" for announcements early in the coming year. Keith is recovering well but has decided against continuing on with the duo touring next year because he is apparently uncomfortable about the use of sequencing in the show. 

As I mentioned in one of my earlier "One to One" answers, part of the idea was to perform just as two musicians revealing the way in which the various records were written and recorded. In this way pieces like Take a Pebble, Tarkus, Bitches Crystal etc were performed simply by the two of us without the use of sequencers etc. 

However, for the benefit of the overall show, pieces such as "Pirates" would not have been possible to perform without using it. The end result was an intimate show which not only offered an insight into the way Keith and I worked as writers and recording artists, but also provided moments of striking high energy entertainment. 

 Overall I was personally happy with this balance and of course we were always open and honest about our use of the technology so there was never any attempt to deceive anyone about its use. 

Anyway, I am very glad you enjoyed the duo experience and thank you very much once again for your kind thoughts.

Best,

Greg.

(Nov-26-2010)

 
Question

We were going through the music collection tonight and were surprised to find a Jerry Jeff Walker cover of a King Crimson song. What other covers of your songs do you find interesting, amusing or just plain odd?

Answer

It is always an honour when someone covers one of my songs. It is of course quite a strange experience hearing someone else sing the words that you created in your own mind, but in the end it is a wonderful form of communication and a truly shared experience.

Best,

Greg.

(Nov-26-2010)

 
Question

Hi Greg, I hope you are well.

Since I am only 17, I was unfortunately not around in the '70s to see you at one of your countless amazing gigs of which I have only seen video clips. I was therefore delighted to get the opportunity to see you along with Carl and Keith at High Voltage! Thankyou for creating this opportunity!

You truly blew my away the first time I was introduced to your music, and again at the festival! Never again will a voice move me in the same way that yours has.

I just wondered, since you wrote 'Lucky Man' whilst at school, how does it feel to have played it to many thousands of adoring fans? Did you ever dream that you would when you originally wrote it?

Thankyou for taking the time to read this, good luck for the future!

Rosanna Beach.

Answer

Dear Rosanna,

Thank you very much for your kind words and for your enduring support. 

I think that the truthful answer to your question is that for me, once a song has been written and recorded it rather takes on a life of its own. People interpret the meaning in so many different ways according to their own feelings and life experiences etc and the songs often take on different meanings as the years pass. 

A lyric, (or part of a lyric) which may have seemed quite simple and straightforward to begin with may start to emit a great deal of pathos and depth of meaning in retrospect and with the benefit of hindsight. Lyrics such as Schizoid Man and Karnevil 9 were very prophetic when I look back now and even songs like Lucky Man reveal a whole new meaning after all these years have passed. That is the reason that Keith decided to write the new prelude to our latest rendition of Lucky Man, if you take a listen to it I am sure you will feel and understand what I am saying.

Anyway, thank you very much for an interesting question and once again I appreciate your continuing support.

Best,

Greg.

(Oct-09-10)

 
Question

Dear Greg, I'm writing from Italy. Despite being a fan of Deep Purple I could appreciate your music. All my friends had a 70s preferred different rockbands and then we exchanged opinions and discussions. I confess that in 1972 or 1973 I went to Milano to see your movie premiere "Pictures at Exhibition" and I was struck by how to play the bass (I always played and still play the bass). It was not easy to see a rock concert in Italy after the troubles of Vigorelli with Led Zeppelin so we made do with movies.
I come to the point: The question I always ask myself the star like you is this: there is friendship between you rockstar? as is the relationship between you? From what we read in the past on music magazines, there is a rivalry?

Thank you for your reply, a cordial greeting. Giancarlo

Answer

Dear Giancarlo,

I think that the bands that really matter are the ones who cared deeply about the music they made and also took a pride in the bands they belonged to. Because of this the bands became rather like families and as in all families from time to time there would occur disagreements and conflicts etc. Most of the time these are minor and petty etc and people get over them, however sometimes they are deep and terminal and that is when bands break apart and the members go their own ways. I doubt if there is any major band that you could name that has not gone through some of this kind of emotional upheaval during their history. The truth is, that some survive and live on and continue to make music and for the others it spells the end of their journey.

Many thanks,

Greg.

(Oct-09-10)

 
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